GOP Wants You to Think Americans Don’t Want to Work

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There’s enough uncertainty around these days to drive us all crazy. But there’s one thing you can count on as sure as the rising sun: The GOP’s continued assault on the character of the American people. To hear them tell it, we’re nothing but a bunch of lazy, entitled takers.

In case you haven’t heard, we’re slowly coming out of the worst pandemic in a century. Our lives have been turned upside down in every which way imaginable. Lives were lost, people got sick, kids couldn’t go to school. On and on I could go. The year 2020 will go down in infamy as one of the worst on record.

And the economy was, of course, one of the biggest losers as far as how the pandemic played out. We lost 20 million jobs during the peak of the lockdowns back in April of last year. Slowly but surely, we’re coming out of the abyss. But it’s going to take time.

What we hear from the national media, though, and by default, today’s radical GOP, the generous unemployment benefits, recently continued with President Biden’s American Rescue Plan, is holding back our economy because people don’t want to work. They’d rather take the additional benefits instead.

That was the narrative I woke up to last Friday as the jobs report announced a less than expected 266k jobs created. Initially, the projection was for over a million jobs. For sure, a disappointing result. And MSNBC’s headline on the TV screen said it all: Breaking News: Shocking Jobs Report!

I added the exclamation point for effect, but that’s how the discussion played out. Stephanie Ruhle interviewed one of Biden’s key economic advisors, Heather Boushey, as I turned on the tube. She was twisting herself in a pretzel to get Ms. Boushey to admit that the extended unemployment benefits were a significant factor in employers not finding willing workers.

To her credit, Ms. Boushey was not taking the bait. She explained that they did not see any evidence that the extra benefits were having that kind of effect. What they were seeing was much more complex and not easy to explain.

She’s right; it’s not easy to explain. And while Ms. Ruhle did mention some of the other factors, she seemed intent on pushing GOP talking points that the American people don’t want to work, especially if they’re receiving money from the federal government.

Once again, though, the answer is not wrapped up in a black, and white blanket like the radical right wants you to think it is. It’s much more complex as to why some Americans are not fighting to get back to work.

Indeed, there are several factors. For one, many children are still not back in school. Daycare, or lack thereof, is undoubtedly a factor. Women, in particular, have been battered, given that they are still usually the primary caregivers in our society. Thus, since many schools and daycares have not fully reopened, there’s bound to be sluggish job participation for the foreseeable future. Hopefully, some of this will improve going forward, and there’s help in this area in Biden’s Rescue Plan that still hasn’t come to full fruition.

In addition, supply-chain bottlenecks are constraining production in critical industries, such as the manufacturing sector, which shed 18k jobs last month, indicating continuing weakness in that category.

And another situation could also be at play. Workers who lost their jobs in specific industries might be looking for other opportunities. Maybe the last year was an eye-opener to these folks. Perhaps they’ve determined what they were doing before isn’t what they want to do in the future.

The health care industry, for one, was perhaps one of the hardest hit during the pandemic. Burnout from long hours, not to mention the depressing nature of so much loss of life and suffering, most certainly could be a significant factor.

And can we please point out the obvious? Isn’t it more than a viable possibility that people are still scared as hell to get back to work? After all, last month was just the beginning, really, of America starting to open up — albeit slowly at that. And while vaccination rates were still rising, we’re still nowhere near where we need to be as far as herd immunity is concerned.


The point here is not to say that extended job benefits aren’t contributing to slowing job growth. They most certainly are, but perhaps one of the reasons is that workers are sick and tired of making crap wages. Maybe they’d like to go back to work but will do so only when employers start sweetening the pot. It appears they are slowly doing just that.

In other words, the jobs report from last month offers up an array of factors as to why the jobs created were so much lower than expected. But you won’t hear much about that from the far-right and their favorite media no-nothing hosts over at Fox News. No, they’d much like you to believe it’s because ‘socialist’ Biden is giving us money so we can sit on our asses and collect the proceeds.

This narrative that we’re a bunch of lazy takers is nothing new, especially in today’s iteration of the Republican Party. The resentment they’ve cultivated for decades now, especially in rural America, is worse than it’s ever been. Time and again, whenever Democrats propose legislation that helps working people in some way, the other side opposes it. We’re one step closer to full-fledged socialism, they say.

In many ways, it’s the same thing we used to hear back in the Reagan era. Remember his welfare queen rhetoric? You know, those people want to keep having babies to make more money from Uncle Sam. How about those folks on food stamps who stand in line at grocery stores with their steak and lobster? Believe me when I say that millions still believe this BS about people in this country.


I’m going to go out on a limb here to say that I believe in the American people much more than our GOP friends do. I think you’ll see our economy start to rejuvenate at a much faster rate. Slowly but surely, Covid appears on a path to which we’ll be able to see it still, but only in the rearview mirror.

Yes, if we do not vaccinate enough people, that could indeed change the trajectory. But so far, the current administration is doing a phenomenal job in getting shots in arms. They take it seriously, unlike the previous guy. There’s no reason to think the American people will not rise to the occasion. They’ll go back to work in due time.

So when you hear the far-right, and even some in the mainstream media, unfortunately, try to tell you millions of Americans are far too eager to sit around collecting from big brother, don’t listen to it for a minute. Research before coming to any conclusions.

We didn’t get into this pandemic overnight. And we aren’t going to end it that way. This once-in-a-lifetime plague took away so much from us. It’s going to take time to get it all back.

Maybe someday, we’ll find out why the GOP has disdain for a particular segment of society. Or why they think some of us don’t want to work. Whatever the reason, it certainly plays to a large portion of their base of support. Once again, it’s pitting Americans against each other — culturally, racially, and economically. It’s what they do best, and they do it well.

The GOP would like you to think we’re a bunch of lazy asses. I beg to differ. We will come back — despite little help from them. As expected, several Republican governors from red states are already telling Biden thanks, but no thanks to the additional unemployment relief. They’ve already determined folks in their states do not need it.

How nice of them. 

59 comments

  1. The thing is, of the jobs are minimum wage jobs with lousy hours & usually you’re being treated like shit. So unemployment or not, it makes sense that people do not want to go back to work. It’s not about being a lazy-ass. It’s about self-respect.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Yes it is, and so much more. Of course some people will take advantage. But geez, we’re just now starting to get back to some kind of normalcy from the worst year I can ever remember. It’s not going to happen overnight. And yes, it certainly is about self-respect. Employers, finally, are going to have to start stepping up and paying people a livable wage. It’s about damn time!

      Liked by 2 people

    2. This might not be the best place to make this comment, saq, but I want to make it somewhere, so here goes. The Republicans are partially correct when then say some people would rather be couch potatoes than productive workers, they know who those people are. They are republIcan voters! But they will never admit that. Not working gives them more time to run around terrorising people of colour, attacking Congress, or recounting votes that have been counted to death. They get to play their war games in the backwoods, so they can be ready when the race wars start. Those are the people who are living on government handouts, and they will continue doing so for as long as they can.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re right rawgod. I cannot disagree with anything you said. It’s like the old saying that Republican voters continue to vote against their own self-interest. Some of these folks clearly are one or two issue voters, be it race/abortion/god/guns etc…They fail to understand that their own party could give a rat’s ass about them. Yet, they’ve been sold a bill of goods and fall for it hook, line, and sinker. It’s only going to get worse.

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    1. You’ve got that right. They wouldn’t recognise the ‘United’ part of the USA if someone wrote it on a three day old fish and slapped them in the face with it…..Come to think of it.
      (Writing from the UK- and I can’t take credit for the idea, it’s been my wife’s for years now)

      Liked by 3 people

  2. Another good analysis, Jeff. Sure, there are some who’d prefer to let others pay their way rather than work for a living–and that includes folks from all demographics, including the very wealthy, whose take from the public coffers far exceeds anything the typical unemployed welfare recipient gets.
    But I’ve seen the typical knee-jerk reaction of conservatives (it was my reaction for years), as you pointed out. As I look back now, I see how easy–and hypocritical–it is to always blame the other guy. “I’m not like that; I worked hard to earn my $100,000 annual income, and now to be able to retire with my huge house and my garage full of expensive vehicles. I’m not like them!” (But for a few twists of fate, you could have been “them.”)
    And, also, regarding the effects of the pandemic on the economy, and the need for mass vaccinations, it’s often these same nutso Trumpist types who refuse to get vaccinated because Bill Gates had the pharmaceutical companies put tracking devices in the vaccines so “The New World Order” can control us. We need a vaccine for the pandemic of crazy.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Thanks Jerry. I wish there was a vaccine for these crazies. Unfortunately, we’re going to have to deal with them. You can’t fix them, for they have no intellectual capacity or curiosity to ever want to search for the truth. Hopefully we’ll get pretty damn close to 70% immunity in this country, which will leave the crazies to fend for themselves and hope they don’t get sick. Hell, they don’t even think Covid is a thing anyway. Sometimes I really pity those folks. Key word: sometimes

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Hey, Jerry, I don’t have the numbers, but I would bet the farm the CEOs of corporations who took government handouts to help them keep their employees wages paid during lockdowns laid off those employees, and used the handouts to give themselves and their cronies huge raises and bonuses, as well as big payoffs to shareholders while claiming exorbitant profit losses. In Canada, our #1 airline took government money, laid off tens of thousandsof employees, and still managed to give their executives bonuses way out of line with quarterly losses in the billions, according to them. If Canadian corporations are doing it, I will bet American corporations taught them how.

      Liked by 3 people

  3. Speaking as one who has been unemployed and who has been an administrator of the Benefit system (UK), I can tell you that the majority of folk hate being on benefits, they feel stripped of their dignity, are never sure if it is going to be stopped for some reason outside of their understanding and get fed up of being labelled (and libelled) as scroungers.
    Only those who have never had to worry about where the next pay-check or few $ / £ s are coming from think that it is an easy way. Ignorant and fortunate- They should suffer the fate of The Dukes in ‘Trading Places’.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. That’s a great analogy Roger-“Trading Places.” Excellent movie and plot. The Dukes of today, for me, are the Koch Bros, or now Koch-singular-as Charles’ bro David passed a few years ago. But both of them were born into wealth, could care less about the working class or anyone else who has to struggle to make it in today’s world. They’ve spent millions, hell-billions maybe-of their own money trying to rig the game for them. It’s an abomination, and our political system allows them to do it. We’ve got to change that!!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I wish you well on that Jeff. It would be an uphill struggle, particularly in the current climate where entitled rich White Males of dubious backgrounds are seen by far too many as heroes of the ordinary people.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Aye Jeff, they are always there, every nation suffers from them.
        Despite my rather austere Far-Left wing stance I always held a fondness for the USA Now with the rise of firstly the Tea-Party and then MAGA I seem to be losing the Nation as a friend. Until there will only be portions of it to like.
        Take care my friend.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. That, my friend, is a sad but true assessment of the current state of affairs here. You take care as well Roger.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Jeff, since my old party is adrift, what has been used as a substitute for discourse is to seize some issue to create a wedge, something that can look good to its base, as they blame the other side. This has been happening since the dawn of politics, but now that disinformation and misinformation can be conveyed so easily, for some it is like shooting fish in a barrel. This is an old message that Ronald Reagan played up in the early 1980s. In these cases, anecdotes for a few are used to paint a broad brush on all.

    When I would speak in front of rotary clubs about helping working homeless families, it stunned some in the audience that people could be working and still be homeless. The clients we helped often had more than one job, but still lost their home. Are there malingerers? Of course, but for the significant majority, people want to work. Keith

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Absolutely true Keith. Most people do want to work. Scapegoating people is, like you said, is as old as dirt. Always blame ‘those’ people. Create animosity, division etc…They should be ashamed of themselves. But, you have to have shame to begin with, and so many in this GOP simply do not.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. True. Right now, the no shame group has taken a belt sander to sand away the former president’s deceitful and seditious actions on and leading up to January 6.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. The entire argument the Republicans are trying to make falls apart with just a little bit of simple math. An extra $300 per month in unemployment benefits vs a potential even AT MINIMUM WAGE of $1,160. No, people are not refusing to work in order to keep that $300 that won’t pay the rent, won’t likely even pay the utility bills. But it’s interesting to think what might happen if those employers who are crying the blues actually paid their people a living wage, say $15 per hour? Good post, Jeff … this issue by the GOP has been gnawing at me for some time, but I hadn’t gotten around to writing about it yet. Thanks for doing it for me! I shall re-blog this afternoon!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you Jill! Yes, paying a living wage. Gee, what a concept eh? In the meantime, corporate CEO’s had a pretty good run during the pandemic. Their pay went up substantially overall. The rest of us? Not so much. And of course, guys like Bezos got richer by the billions. Time to start taxing these guys big-time. Enough is enough! And, if Biden administration can somehow start clawing back the trillions in hidden money overseas, imagine what that could do for our country. Hmmmm….Again, what a concept, huh?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Yes, what a novel idea … too bad nobody ever thought of it before, eh? In truth, some days I wonder if the whole damn world has gone crazy, or if I’ve just outlived my usefulness here on Planet Earth. I hope that somehow Biden can get his legislation passed and make those billionaires start coughing up their fair share. If not, then we truly will have a plutocracy before long. Sigh.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Reblogged this on Filosofa's Word and commented:
    The GOP, the Party of Crooks and Liars, has a new theory that unemployment benefits have made people too lazy to work, hence companies paying only minimum wages cannot find workers. Some states are actually in the process of cutting off employment benefits! For several days now, I have been growling under my breath about this, but hadn’t gotten around to writing about it yet. Jeff, however, was more on-the-ball than I was and has done such an excellent job on this that I will simply share his, for his views reflect my own.

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  7. I see the basis of such statements, which are generally despicable of people, in the fact that naturally wealthy groups – and these are those who regularly do not work, but only want to think and give orders – live mainly from the fact that others create added value for them in factories. The USA has aligned itself too closely with the traditional European system that can be described as feudal. Where is the state-supported commitment to move from dishwasher (i.e. dependent wage earners) to millionaire (i.e. independent decision-makers)? It is clear that too many of them let themselves be lured by credit, and are now actually only working off wealth that they should have saved themselves over decades. This is how it worked in old Europe, when the nobility saw no chance of continuing serfdom. 😉 Best wishes, Michael

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your insights Michael. I agree with you. What really boggles the mind is the fact that we urge young people to go to college/trade school etc..yet, once they do attend and graduate, they’re left with thousands in debt-before they even begin to start their careers. Over 1.3 trillion in student debt as of now. Just think if that would no longer be the case. You go to school, it’s paid for, you get out, and start your life free and clear of the anvil of debt hanging over your head. How can that not be a good thing? Would that not be an incredible shot in the arm for our economy? I hope we start to seriously move in this direction. Because what we do now is not working.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. This is actually a non-comment, Jeff, I already made two above. I am wondering, is there some way you can make it so I do not have to log in every time I make a comment, half the time losing the comment into the ether. I have remedied the losses, if I take the time to copy the comments, but your blog is one of the few I have to log in every time. Yes, I tick the Remember Me box, but it has a shorter memory than I do. So, just wondering… I would appreciate it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hmmm. Well, for me, if I’m logged into WordPress, which I always am, I’m free to comment on other wordpress blogs as I see fit. In other words, If I read one of Jill Dennison’s posts for example, I can freely comment on them at anytime. I actually just went to your homepage, clicked on comment, and my Brookingslib icon came up, which allowed me to comment if I wished. So, seems to me that if you’re signed in to wordpress, you should always be able to comment on my posts. Does this make sense?

      Like

      1. It makes sense for most blogs, but not yours, and occasionally a few others than I happen to come across. Because I am directly answering a comment right now, rather than being on your blog, this might go through without misadventure. Time will tell. But if I write a comment directly on your blog, it asks me to sign in, even though all the info appears with just a few letters, and then I have to use my WP password to get the comment submitted. It wants to know if I can prove I am really me.
        I do not understand…

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      2. Yeah. Very perplexing rawgod. It’s the first I’ve heard of it so I’m not sure quite how to handle it. Perhaps you can’t do a direct comment if you don’t follow a particular blog? Could that be it?

        Like

      3. Nope. I don’t follow a lot of blogs because I need time to live my life. I depend on people like Jill and a few others to point me to posts they feel are important reading. I could easily get trapped in following a lot of blogs, I tried that for awhile. But I was
        spending 16 hours a day online, and my partner was not very happy with me. I never even noticed. So now I have to restrict myself to but a few hours, so I need to be very selective.
        Politics and such are not my main focus in life. Spirituality, as in spiritual atheism, is the most important thing in my life. But it is an individual process, not that important to many. Politics is of interest to almost everyone who cares about life in general, so there is a lot to talk about there. You and Jerry are an interesting combo, but so are a number of others. I might be missing a lot by not following you, but there are only so many hours in a day.
        All this is to say that one does not need to follow a blog to comment easily on it. But yours is the bane of my Word Press existence. I know you haven’t noticed, but I am very verbose. I think very deeply about a lot of things, and therefore have a lot to say. And when I lose a comment, I become very frustrated, because I write from the heart, and half the time I cannot reproduce a comment just minutes after I try to publish it.
        And that is why I brought this up. I have no idea if other commenters have this problem on any sites, I so seldom do on others. But yours, it has taken me a long time to figure it out, and sometimes I have to post it three or four times before I actually see it appear on your blog. I have no idea why.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I get your point rawgod. It’s really hard to follow and read so many blogs. I too, have that same problem. I follow a few, read them when I can, and when I have more time, I read even more. I appreciate you friend. Anytime you spend time reading my stuff and commenting, I’m honored. Perhaps someone else out there can weigh in on what we’ve discussed, as far as being able to comment on my posts? I’d welcome all comers. Hopefully we can come up with a solution. In the meantime, thanks again. I appreciate the passion you bring!

        Like

  9. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
    This is the ‘GQP” … what it always was!! … “The GOP would like you to think we’re a bunch of lazy asses. I beg to differ. We will come back  –  despite little help from them. As expected, several Republican governors from red states are already telling Biden thanks, but no thanks to the additional unemployment relief. They’ve already determined folks in their states do not need it.”

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Brookingslib, I have 3 questions for you: 1: For people who want to work but have disabilities that make some forms of work impractical, even impossible, what accommodations can be made in your opinion that can help them? 2: On the matter of disability benefits being an influencing factor for work hours, how would you like to see the system fixed? 3: For people who actually don’t want to work and believe that they are entitled to free stuff, what will it take to get them to get their act together?

    Like

    1. Your first two questions I really do not have an answer for. Both are complex and I’ve not done much research on it. I get a sense these things affect you a lot more than they do me, due to the fact you’re a business owner? All I’ll say on people who basically cannot work due to disabilities, we do have the American With Disabilities Act, and other safety net features like Social Security Disability. These days, perhaps more emphasis on home based or internet based work is a way for some of them to find work. I just don’t have a valid answer for you.
      On the last one, however, you continue to press me on all the lazy people who want ‘free stuff.’ This bothers you to no end and I cannot begin to change your opinion. I might turn the question around a bit for you. You don’t like these people sitting on their asses doing nothing and getting paid. How do you feel about the nearly 60 corporations who did not pay federal income taxes last year? I realize our Congress has allowed these loopholes, and bad on them for doing so. But, is this ok in your view while people are literally waiting in food bank lines and barely surviving?
      Is it also ok for the super wealthy to be planting much of their vast fortunes in tax-haven countries overseas? Just to avoid paying federal income taxes here?
      See, my friend, those are the things I worry about. You, continue to worry about all the ‘free stuff’ you see people getting. Sorry, I’m not going there.
      And also, as I admitted in my post, yes, there are some indications that the extra unemployment benefits are keeping some from going back to work. But it’s not the whole picture, which is why a wrote what I wrote. Perhaps it’s time people start paying better wages? Maybe people are sick and tired of working for crap. Maybe the end result of all of this is that we may get to a $15 minimum wage, through the free market.
      Isn’t that what you advocate for? Have a great day. Thanks again for the debates.

      Like

      1. Brookingslib, if we did not have personal income taxes and people got to keep more of their money, everyone would be better off. We did just fine without any form of income taxation for many years.

        Like

      2. My friend, this is nothing but a bunch of libertarian BS. I’m sorry. I disagree with that philosophy. And it will never, ever, become policy with the US government. Next time you drive on the Interstate, go to an airport, take a bus, take a train, take a drink of water, most of these things are paid for with tax dollars. I’d hate to live in the America you seem to want to live in. Sounds like a miserable place.

        Like

      3. Here are videos for you: 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKZkmS8m_oo, 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wi-D24oCa10, 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-uYs3rjKLZo, 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBwooFk0yGc People who want to tax the rich and redistribute that wealth to the rest of us under the guise of fairness don’t care about fairness.

        Here are 3 questions for you: 1: Did the possibility not occur to you that politicians who talk about redistribution of wealth would be unwilling to give away any of their own wealth voluntarily? 2: Did you know that the income tax was expressly prohibited under Article 1, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution? 3: Did it never occur to you that people who advocate taxing the rich and redistributing that wealth to the rest of us with our doing nothing to earn any of it are not too different from people who stole land from Native-American tribes by forcing them to relocate to other places and the people who stole the labor of African-Americans via slavery?

        Like

      4. You really just don’t want to pay taxes, do you?
        Another bogus argument on your part. Here, are some facts for you friend. All the ridiculous arguments over the years from anti-tax people like yourself, with subsequent case law, can be found here: https://www.irs.gov/privacy-disclosure/the-truth-about-frivolous-tax-arguments-section-i-d-to-e
        Also, have you ever heard of the 16th Amendment, which expressly allows the income tax? https://www.britannica.com/topic/Sixteenth-Amendment
        Perhaps you need to find a tax free country?

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Brookingslib, you are way off-base. I am happy to pay my share of taxes. Beyond that, the only people who should have any right to my money are me and my family members. By the way, those videos intended for Nan, let Nan see them and Nan can render a judgment either way.

        Like

      6. Sorry. I don’t watch videos. For several reasons. But one that I’ll share with you is that videos are nearly always suggested to reinforce a person’s personal viewpoint. Just because someone else agrees with them, they seem to feel that makes their opinion more valid. Sorry. Doesn’t work that way.

        Liked by 1 person

      7. rag — I don’t think you were living when there was “no form of income taxation,” so one wonders how you would know that “we did just fine.”

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Nan, before the income tax and the welfare state, where was the Great Depression? Where was the out-of-wedlock birthrate that allowed people to be dependent on welfare if people never got married? We did not have any of these problems insofar as I know.

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      1. Nan, the income tax, talk of redistribution of wealth, the establishment of the welfare state all have one thing in common: Re-enslaving people to the whims of government.

        Like

  12. Atheistmilitantsrising, Brookingslib and Rawgod, before the welfare state was created, there were more people in the workforce. While it is true that there are people who may fall on hard times economically, I would be inclined to believe that they would be more willing to work than people who sit on their butts and ask for handouts. Do you want to know why Red states seem to have more problems than Blue states? Because Blue states keep siphoning money from Red states. Getting rid of the deductibility for state and local taxes would probably put a stop to the siphoning of wealth from republican states to democrat states.

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      1. Nan, I have engaged Scottie on multiple topics. He seems to be willing to discuss the really important political stuff from what I have observed.

        Like

    1. You’re wrong friend. Lower-tax Red States take far more money from federal gov than due the more high tax Dem states. They are, indeed, takers. https://apnews.com/article/north-america-business-local-taxes-ap-top-news-politics-2f83c72de1bd440d92cdbc0d3b6bc08c?fbclid=iwar0pkrk2b49loryvj6fc0wxbdzmyrsprnccu8_2ougx7uc6o0g97wjxblrq
      I don’t know if you’ll be able to click on this link, but it’s from the Associated Press fact check desk. Bottom line: Dem states send far more in tax dollars than they receive from Red States. And I’d also submit to you that looking at where states rank as far as education, health care and the like, most at the bottom are in the Deep South. The R’s in those states couldn’t care less about their constituents, but love to place blame on the liberal left for everything. Most of them never expanded Medicaid, which would have helped millions with health care. Yet, they refused. Why?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. rag — one wonders why you seem unable to move past the same old refrain. Jeff has provided backup links to his POV, yet you continue to respond with the same old tired remarks that people won’t work because they’d rather live off the government. While this may be true of SOME, it’s unfair to judge all the less fortunate the same. Besides the fact, it simply isn’t true.

        Liked by 1 person

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