Message to the Right: Racism is Alive and Well in America

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When it comes to race in this country, I sometimes hesitate to weigh in. After all, I’m a 58-year-old white male. What gives me the right to comment on the plight of African-Americans and other people of color when I haven’t experienced the kind of institutional racism they have?

I’d be remiss if I didn’t say anything, though. The rage I feel inside is real. It’s called empathy, the last time I checked. It’s putting yourself in someone else’s shoes, or at least an ability to think in that manner.

When I see a white cop with his knee on the neck of a black man screaming, “I can’t breathe!” my first instinct is to say to the white policeman, “take your goddamn knee off his neck, you’re killing him!” If that were me suffering the same fate, I’d like to think most would mouth those very same words.

It wasn’t me, though, and it probably never would be me simply because the color of my skin is different from that of George Floyd, the man murdered by Minnesota Police Officer Derek Chauvin on Monday in Minneapolis. Thankfully Chauvin has since been arrested and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Unfortunately, the days in between the murder and arrest, the city of Minneapolis erupted in a sea of flames and angry protests. For a few days, at least, America’s attention turned from a persistent pandemic to another persistent problem that we can’t seem to solve in this country: racism.

It always rears its ugly head. For sure, weeks and sometimes months go by as we shove our racial issues under the rug, only uncovered when overzealous cops or vigilante’s masquerading as such, murders another black male or female.

If you listen to some on the right, they’d like to make us all think that racism isn’t a real problem in America–that we elected the first African-American to the presidency in 2008, which solved the race issue in the country once and for all.

Wrong.

It’s not over and never will be until we start to address the core causes and inconvenient truths that so many of us refuse to discuss.

For one, can we admit that the reason we have Donald Trump as president is that white America feels it’s once firm grip on power is slowly slipping away? Can we acknowledge that the black guy in office for eight years was the final straw for them?

Can we also admit that the system of policing in this country needs a total and complete overhaul, with national standards and a new commitment to racial understanding and sensitivity? Perhaps we should start looking at other Western democracies around the world and what works or doesn’t work for them. It certainly can’t hurt.

And while this isn’t a popular idea overall in America, perhaps we need to consider reparations for the black community. When I say reparations, I do not necessarily mean handing out a check to every African-American in the country. I’ve heard other ideas out there worth exploring, such as vouchers for medical insurance or college, or access to a trust fund to finance a business or a home. Whatever form it might take, we need more white Americans to get on board.

Yes, things have improved since the 1960s, but we’re not even close to being where we need to be in 2020. Until white America comes to grips with this reality, we’ll keep having these flareups over and over.

And if you need some proof as to how many Americans feel about race in America, I’d like to share the following tweet from a guy who has nearly two million followers and is the author of a book called, “The MAGA Doctrine.”

This tweet shows the kind of ignorance and shortsightedness that plagues so much of American life today. The fact that at least 40% of the public will cast their votes for a racist president in November is troubling enough. And these are the folks who love to exploit the protests going on in Minneapolis and other cities. They’re nothing but malcontents blowing up their cities, they say.

Yet they don’t say a word when white militia types with military assault weapons invade governor’s mansions and statehouses, demanding they reopen businesses. That behavior is considered a constitutional exhibition of their First and Second Amendment rights. The folks stirring things up in Minneapolis and elsewhere need to calm down and behave. How is that fair?

I do not condone any of the violence going on in American cities. To me, violence is never the answer and only feeds into right-wing racial rhetoric. But damn it, I understand their frustration and anger. It’s that empathy thing again. I’d ask that we all try to put ourselves in George Floyd’s shoes, as well as his family and those demanding justice on the streets of America.

What if it were your son, brother, or grandson lying on the street, motionless and screaming for help?

How would you feel?

59 comments

  1. Right before I read your post Jeff, I had commented to my husband as we’re watching the protests, that if the images on the tv were in black and white, I’d think it was the 1960s. You’re right, there are some things that have changed since then, but not enough. Not nearly enough. I’m a 55 year old white woman and can’t imagine what it’s like being judged for the color of your skin. Ahmaud Arbery. Breonna Taylor. George Floyd. These are the latest victims of the systematic racism that’s rampant in this country. Christian Cooper in NYC could have easily become another. Rioting is never the answer, but I leave you with these words from Martin Luther King Jr: “A riot is the language of the unheard.”

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I hear you Kim. We’re in the same age range. Both of us are old enough to remember the 60s and early 70s. Instead of going forward..we keep going back. The world is watching us and I bet they’re in absolute shock at what we’ve become. You’re right, I do not condone the violence. No way. This will probably not end well. I’m hoping for the best but when you combine a pandemic with racial animosity? This is what you get. And we have the worst president at the worst possible time.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Rioting is not an answer, but, sometimes, when no one is listening, and no one else is doing anything about it, you have to do something to get everyone’s attentions. It happened across the US in 1967. This is 2020, and all that is happening is the police are still getting away with murder and violence, and as far as people of colour are concerned, nobody cares “enough” to change it.
      America could burn again, and whites MUST own that.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I absolutely agree. The cases that wind up making the news are just a few,and even with those, how often is justice served. I honestly do not know how people of color can stand to live with this day after day. And then have to listen to certain politicians an pundits loudly proclaim there is no racism problem in America. It makes me sick. The violence that is happening all over the country right now is not right, but it’s understandable. I just hope cooler heads prevail and there are more peaceful protests.

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      2. The violence may not be right, but it is certainly not wrong either. It is years of pressure suddenly forced to blow its top off, instead of being bled off some every year. When it explodes, people and property and other living beings get hurt. We might understand bombs, but we do not understand marginalized people. Looking down is much easier than looking up!

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      3. Sad but true rawgod. I hate seeing the destruction. It seems counterintuitive, no? But as Kent State proved, and other riots and disturbances proved in that era, stuff did get done because of those things. I hope…I really hope that the same thing happens this time around. All I’ll say is: Elections matter!!!!

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  2. I absolutely agree with every one of your points here – especially reparations. Across political boundaries, we’re all united by no one wanting to say: we have committed a grievous wrong, and we have never put it right. Stopping legally-sanctioned slavery, sharecropping, Jim Crow and segregation isn’t the same as fixing the harm those institutions wrought. We can’t admit fault – no matter what. We can’t even admit there’s a problem.

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    1. I know what you mean. What’s required is leadership at the very top. We’re a ship without a captain. I hope to hell when we come out of this, some real hard choices will be made on how we fix our communities and cities. They’re hurting bad. No time for baby steps. We need systematic and fundamental change. FAST

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      1. Actually, Jeff, this will not work from the top down, though that wouldn’t hurt. It must happen from the grass-roots up. The other thing it needs is Black/coloured leaders, no white leaders. No white person, not even me who am only part white, truly understands the problem. Like in South Africa, where apartheid was spearheaded by Black Afrcans, the same needs to be done here. Support them! But don’t try to tell them how to run a revolution. They (we) must do it for ourselves.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Can’t really argue that point. We at the grassroots must PUSH those at the top. It’s like FDR said way back when…”Now, make me do it.” or something like that. That’s what needs to happen

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    2. Trump is flaming the fires of hate by holding Antifa and the Radical Left responsible for rioting & looting. Totally baseless and false accusation, that’s who we have as “leader” of the free world.

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  3. With all due respect reparations strike me as a white America band-aide solution. African Americans don’t want free education or medical insurance, how is that fair to millions of impoverished white Americans? Why isn’t America talking about the for-profit prison system? A contractual obligation at State level to keep prison beds full or risk financial payment to private prison corporations? For profit prisons disproportionally full of young black men whose only crime is skin colour and inability to hire a Lawyer in their defense? Why isn’t America talking racial profiling? Acting as if justice valued blacks with equal consideration as white citizens? America is delusional!
    I’m Canadian, my husband black, children mixed race. We used to enjoy U.S. road trips – America put an end to that. We’ve been harassed, terrorized on highways and refused service in restaurants from Spokane Washington to Gary Indiana. You couldn’t pay us to cross the Canada/U.S. border again. The world is sparkling kaleidoscope of culture and perspectives, sadly America no longer registers as a destination. Why? Because U.S. racism deems the nation unsafe for anyone born with dark skin.

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    1. I hear the frustration in your voice. I feel it as well. America’s so called ‘exceptionalism’ was never a real thing anyway but it’s now a complete fabrication. We need systematic reforms across the board. There’s an element of society that tends to gravitate towards law enforcement. What I mean by that is white supremacist/racist tough guys who go into the job already with hatred towards blacks and other people of color. That’s why I’m calling for national standards of some sort. We need to weed these people out, overhaul how we train them, and so much more. Reparations are only a suggestion. I think they have some merit. I’m not talking freebies, per se, but more of an opportunity fund or something like that. Prison reform is absolutely part of the whole mix. Private prisons? They should have never been allowed in the first place. Totally agree.
      So many problems over here. I sometimes envy your country. I know it’s not perfect up there but I think you guys do it right for the most part. Right now, I’ve never been more ashamed to be an American. I hope we take the biggest step possible in November by removing the current president. That’s first and foremost on my mind at this point. We’ll have a big mess to clean up after he’s gone. But we can at least start the process.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Don’t envy us, Jeff, we are no better than you. The % of aboriginal Canadians, including Metis, in prisons, compared to the racial make-up in Canada, shows that an aboriginal person is FIVE HUNDRED TIMES more likely to end up in prison as a white person. Yet there are relatively much fewer aboriginal people in Canada by at least 50 to 1. The only explanation is racism.
        We are just as much assholes as you are.

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      2. Until we stop seeing the color of people’s skin as a threat, or simply to hate because someone looks different, nothing of substance will change. That, of course, is a heavy lift that will certainly not come about while I’m still upright and breathing on this planet. I guess baby steps is all we’ll see, if we’re even lucky to get that. Very disappointing

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      3. More inter-racial children would also help, though we cannot force such things to happen. It would be nice to have the white disappear into soft brown or soft red tones,
        There could be no racism if we all looked more similar

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      4. Let me explain why suggestion of reparation makes me grumpy. Reparations are pointless, they mask rather than tackle the problem of racism. I’m white, my husband black, children mixed race. Even in Canada my husband had “the talk” with youngest son whose skin is darkest. The talk consists of “you will be singled out of a crowd based on appearance, it’s not your fault, keep hands where they can be seen, keep calm, answer questions respectfully and if all else fails mention your father is a Lawyer. My children are the lucky ones, we live in Canada and their father is a Lawyer. Trust me, youngest son has relied on “the talk” more than once. I shudder to think of black Americans void of the lawyer card.

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      5. When you deal with something that’s systematic….the solutions are not going to be easy no matter what they might be. I hope…I really hope, this time will be different for my country. But the attention spans are very short. With economic ruin and the pandemic, maybe this is the perfect storm we need to get our asses in gear and get meaningful reform. A bit idealistic on my part perhaps. But that’s ok. If we don’t have hope, what is left?

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Really nice work Jeff! 👍👍

    I deeply appreciate what you do and how well you do it. Looking forward to sharing the helm with you again… just as soon as life permits it (whenever that day comes.😑)

    Hang in there… there’s great value in this project!!

    Liked by 3 people

  5. It boggles my mind that the Trumpist types virtually always, reflexively, assume that in situations similar to the George Floyd case the citizen being bullied or killed by the law enforcement officer(s) “had it coming. He must have done something really bad or the cop wouldn’t do that.” That attitude does a 180 when a law enforcement agency says a loved one–or, God forbid, their messiah, the Donald, broke a law. Then the law enforcement agency is part of the “deep state” out to get an innocent person. You are right, many people seem to be incapable of empathy. I’d like to think there could be an easy remedy for such a malady. I doubt there is.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. We’re at an inflection point here Jerry. Everything is finally coming together all at once. Pandemic…racism…Trump destroying democracy. I keep hoping this will end well. I’m not confident. The ‘Messiah’ as you so eloquently call him, is without honor, dignity, empathy, or any other virtue one would expect a President of the U.S to possess. November is not soon enough to eject his giant rear end from the White House.

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  6. Very well said, my friend! We came a long way from the ’60s, but for the last 3+ years we have been turning back toward those days. There is no doubt in my mind that some would like to return to the days of segregated schools, blacks being forced to sit at the back of the bus, drink out of separate water fountains, etc. This has become, in my eyes, an ugly, ugly nation filled with more hate than love. Like you, I deplore the violence, but I understand it. Blacks have been trying to make their voices heard for decades and largely the country has simply ignored them. What are they supposed to do??? I am furious over this killing, as I have been over so many others in the past decade, starting with Trayvon Martin in 2012. Thanks for this thoughtful post …

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    1. Thanks so much Jill….and for the reblog of course. I feel so powerless. I’m watching the news off and on today…Twitter etc…and it’s just plain gut-wrenching. Now the moron and his thug AG Barr are fanning the flames trying to pin it all on the ‘far-left’ Everything they do is political. Everything is geared toward pitting all of us against each other. I fear November Jill. I really do.

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      1. I hear you. I think we are in for a heap of trouble over the summer, and perhaps beyond. Congress needs to get off their collective arses and put the brakes on Trump, but will they? Hell no! I fear November, I fear this summer, and I fear the time between November and January 20th if Biden wins. We need help … we need a rescuer! You and I … well, we’ve made a commitment and depending on how things go over the next few weeks, we might just have to get back in the saddle a bit sooner than we had planned. I wish to heck that Biden would go ahead and name his VP! I think Klobuchar is done now that it is reported she refused to prosecute Chauvin with more than 10 accusations of police brutality. I think Harris is done, since as Attorney General she kept men in prison even after they were proven innocent by The Innocence Project. So, that leaves Elizabeth Warren … simple, right? But he’s saying he won’t decide ’til August????? Sigh.

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      2. I agree with you on ‘getting back in the saddle’ sooner rather than later. When duty calls, right?
        l agree with you about the VP pick. Yes, Warren would be an excellent choice. I’m really fond of Rep. Val Demmings though. Just so impressed with her. Chief of Police in Orlando and now a congress person for two terms, plus was on the impeachment prosecution team. She’s relatively young..62. Do you remember the Pulse Nightclub massacre a few years ago? She really impressed me back then as well. I know she’s being vetted, so we’ll see what Biden decides. The only downside I see is her overall experience. To me it’s not an issue, but others may think so. I’m hearing Pelosi really likes Demmings, so that can’t hurt. What do you think of her Jill?

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      3. Yes … we certainly didn’t see all this coming, but even if we only put out one every now and then until September, I think it may be a good idea. But, let’s see what happens in the next few days. I’m so completely devastated by the state of this nation and Trump acting as if everything is peachy and fine. The G7 thing … I was so proud of Angela Merkel!!! She is truly the leader of the free world now! Yes, I well remember the Pulse Night Club massacre, but though the name Val Demmings is familiar, admittedly I know nothing about her. My project tomorrow will be to do some research and then I’ll let you know what I think, probably via email.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. IMHO, i think reparations are long overdue. I realize many will question where the money will come from, and this will bankrupt the country. Well that excuse no longer holds, as this pandemic shows the gov’t printing money like there’s no tomorrow, and corporations/ banks were the first to get “bailed out” with trillion dollar giveaway.
    Why not impose a reparations tax on large corporations that were exploiting labor for decades, minimum wage with no benefits, i’m look at you Walmart, Target, Amazon. With 100s of billions in profit every year, they can’t contribute back to society a little? I think reparations to all American workers are in order as well!
    I know there are no easy solutions to racism and money doesn’t make up for centuries of oppression and murder but we have to start somewhere, at least with an intention to change the culture of hate.
    Like the LA riots of the 90’s this crucible is reaching it’s melting point. I’m glad to see the officer responsible for murder has been arrested. We have real work to do in this country.

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  8. When the government made monetary reparations to Aboriginal people caught up in the Residential School genocide attempt, a lot of whites bitched and complained about “their” money being used to pay for crimes they never committed. I can see American whites getting even more vocal.
    And after that money dried up, and was spent, the outcomes were not very good. What may have been better would have been to take the prime land that once was “owned” by aboriginal people away from the present owners, and given back to the original owners. FAT CHANCE of that ever happening.
    Money is only meaningful to those who want it. What most of us want is our dignity back. We want to hear
    people with red skin or black or brown skin are not animals, or savages, but people in our own right. You would never believe how many whites still treat us that way, especially cops and government officials!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I absolutely believe whites treat you that way still. It’s so intrinsic, so systematic. You’d think when newer generations come about, the road to equality would get better. Nothing could be further from the truth, it seems.
      Yes, reparations are but one part of the discussion and a bunch of white people would bitch and complain to no end. My Trump loving friends always complain about their ‘hard-earned’ tax money going to help illegals or ‘lazy’ good for nothings who sit at home while THEY work so hard. It sickens my stomach every time I have that discussion with them.
      That said, it’s still a conversation worth having…reparations that is.

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      1. I’m not convinced. There are things much more important than money. It’s like parents who don’t have time to give their children love. Instead they buy them everything they want to compensate for their lack of love. All that teaches them is how to be spoiled. My best friend growing up was like that. All he had to do was ask. He hated his parents something horrible, but he used them too. He couldn’t understand why I didn’t treat my parents the same way. He knew jothing about physical abuse. I did.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You have a right to be skeptical. I certainly am. It’s true what you say..it’s not all about money. But years of economic stagnation and lack of opportunity certainly have taken it’s toll on so many in our country, and around the world quite frankly. Billionaires make more billions…millionaires make more millions…the rest of us? Here’s a few crumbs. Economic stability goes a long way towards having a more happy and content life. I would think that’s what we all want, right? Getting there is the problem though. We have to think outside the box much more than we do.

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      3. Not outside the box, but outside all the boxes. There are more boxes than we have time to count. Including the box of “economic stability.” White people are more or less brought up to become part of the economy, to go to school, to get a job, build a family and repeat generation after generation. Not everyone has been brought up to do that. Look around, Jeff, and see that different cultures have different ways of “socializing” their children. But because the “most powerful countries” in the world are based on economy, we expect every society to function like us. Systemic racism again!
        The major religion by area in the world is Christianity, as invented by whites. Systemic racism again! (Islam is starting to spread wider, Their religion is part of their culture. Christians fear that.)
        What it the most widespread money in the world today? The American dollar. Systemic racism yet again.
        Democracy (as invented by white people) is the most desired type of government, even though it has repeatedly been shown not to work. Systemic racism. Not every country is socialized for democracy.
        People want to be productive. Not true. All they want to do is have enough food and shelter for a short while, then to move on elsewhere. Nomads are looked down on. Just look how the Rom (gypsies) are treated. Homebound folk hate them for being free to go where they want, when they want.
        A little note about me. In my late teens until my early 30s I was happiest when hitchhiking around North America, never having a goal in sight, just going where rides would take me. That was the best time of my life. Meeting new people everywhere, every day. I wish I could still live like that in my 70s, but my health could not stand it. But truly, I’ve never had a desire to be productive, even when I had to be.
        The American dream is not my dream. In fact, it is my nightmare!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Your words struck a chord with me rawgod. I too have often wondered what it would have been like if I took off on my own for about a year when I was younger. I still have regrets that I never did that. But I admire the fact that you did.
        A lot of what you say is true. Most people, I think, just want to be able to have the necessities in life, never fear economic collapse, maybe have a decent place to live, and take a nice vacation once in a while. It’s so depressing that these things seem so far out of reach for so many in our world. But you’d think that the richest country in the world, the U.S., would figure it out. No such luck I’m afraid. This will certainly outlive you and I.

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      5. Hopefully you weren’t abused as a child. The largest part of leaving home was to get away from my sperm donor. I did not want to even be in the same city as him.

        Liked by 1 person

      6. No, I was not. And so sorry to hear that about your childhood. Doing what you did makes all the sense in the world. I’d have done the same thing….

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      7. Don’t feel sorry for me, Jell, I don’t. Abuse was part of what makes me me. Feel sorry for the ones whose lives were destroyed, those not able to survive. They are the ones who need our compassion and sympathy. They didn’t stand a chance.
        Nuclear families with loving, caring parents may work, seems like yours did. But yours is the oddity. Nuclear families are hell on Earth for the most part.

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  9. That sounds very bad and should never have happened again. Nevertheless, as a German, I do not believe that racism is on the rise in the United States. Here in Germany, we only have a more origanized public relations work in order not to such news to a worldwide audience. Please remember a migrant burned in a prison cell in Dresden. To this day, no one wants to take responsibility for this. Michael

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good hearing from you Michael. I’m not aware of that incident in Dresden you refer to. Sorry about that. But, whether it’s on the rise or not over here is not really the issue. It never really left. Yes, we’ve made some progress over the years. But we have a fairly large group of white people over here who never did accept the first black president in our history. Trump, in my view, represents a kind of ‘last hurrah’ for them. He says outwardly, what they feel when it comes to illegal immigration, people of color etc…We’re going to have to take a look at perhaps a new Civil Rights/Voting Rights movement, with legislation and a huge city and community economic revival. It won’t be easy. I realize it’s not perfect, anywhere. But we can learn a few things from your country, as well as others. We certainly are NOT the beacon of democracy for the world anymore. Hopefully this November, we can begin to get back to that mindset by defeating the current president…soundly and decisively. An alternative outcome is dire.

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      1. Thank you very much for your very important information. Excuse i was wrong with Dresden, it was Dessau, in 2005: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Oury_Jalloh.
        I agree with you, but as i wrote Germany has a much more better public relations system for this. Here only a few persons had had raised the voices, in 2005. In the rural area where I live – near the border with the Czech Republic – the hatred of the Czech Republic is unimaginable because of lost areas in Eastern Europe, after WWII.

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  10. I find it difficult to put myself in George Floyd’s shoes. I am a 67-year-old white woman, so as outraged as I am I know I cannot truly understand what it is like to be black (or any shade other than white). I can tell you however, that I know deep in my heart that if I’d been there that day I would have been screaming at the cops involved to ease up a little. How do I know this? First, I’m not afraid of police – there are several in my family – and I know they would have handled the situation differently. Second, I don’t take kindly to any sort of racism. I’m the woman who notices the subtleties of discrimination; I’m the woman who calls people out for off-color jokes or comments; I’m the woman who, in my youth and more recently, has yelled at police when people have been mistreated. We need to do more than merely write about injustices such as these. We need to start acting like all lives matter.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. What you do by calling out people for their comments and speaking out is the model for which we all should aspire to. Good on you for that. I need to do better myself in that regard. I’ve got people in my family who say these kind of things and at times I’ve fallen short in responding properly. I must do better. I admire your persistence and honesty.

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      1. It’s not always accepted in ‘polite’ company and sometimes I admit to merely saying “I’m sorry, but I don’t thing that’s acceptable” and walking away. We all need to try harder.

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  11. I didn’t have time to read the many comments, Jeff, but once again I’m in total agreement with you. The post I released Saturday expressed my feelings and added some info about the Supreme Court’s role in letting police off the hook. But there’s a glimmer of hope: Justices Thomas and Sotomayor are in agreement (!) that this ruling goes too far, so if the right case comes along, we might see some positive change. But we need to remake our society, and we need to start pronto.

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    1. So true Annie. This time doing nothing is NOT an option. The people are speaking…loudly. I need to read your Saturday post for I have not done that yet. I will though.

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  12. I can appreciate your sentiments of empathy and that your message was not filled with anger and rage as that does nothing to help our country heal. I am similarly in your shoes being middle-aged and white. You most likely also grew up in an era where manners and common sense contributed to overall civility. While my heart breaks for what happened to George Floyd and others tragically killed — even to the horrific lynchings of days past, I have also raised several questions since all of this began.
    True, if black lives matter, why do statistics indicate they kill more of themselves? Aren’t they actually sending the message that black lives don’t matter to them? If black lives matter, why are the majority of black woman single parents? Isn’t the father sending a message that his children’s black lives don’t matter? Instead of continually crying out victimization, I think everyone (whites included) need to take personal responsibility for their part in the problem. (And this includes everyone from politicians to Hollywood to media bias to fake news to social media to educators to sheeple to Thought Police to businesses and on and on.) Quite frankly, I find accusing people of white supremacy because they worked hard for what they have to be reverse racisim and insane. Humiliating whites is not the solution. Hate begets hate.
    If there’s one positive in all of this mess, it’s that everyone is talking about it. But, too much of it is vitriolic hatred and not solution based. That’s where I, thankfully, found videos by Bob Woodson and Shelby Steele. They are black leaders who thoroughly understand the problem with why blacks are where they are in America and why reparations are not the answer. (That only keeps whites in the supremacy seat for saying they have the power to lift up blacks.) People do not appreciate anything they do not have a stake in. All of the housing, food stamps, affirmative action and other programs have not lifted blacks up. They have kept them enslaved. (Presumably you have had times in your life that were challenging but made you stronger for meeting them.) Once blacks stop viewing themselves as victims and begin focusing on the solution, as Woodson and Steele offer, only then do I think their situations will improve. Likewise, as Niger Innis revealed the BLM organization is not about black lives. Once people wake up to that perhaps the hateful witch hunts and destruction of America will cease.
    We cannot force people to believe or think only one way. But we can encourage human decency and respect among each other. This is a passionate topic for so many; apologies for the lengthy comment.

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    1. Thank you for that. And thanks for the follow. I followed you as well. You know, we have made some progress in America. But not nearly enough. And it seems when we take one step forward, we then take two steps back. Let’s hope we’re finally at an inflection point in this country. It sure seems that way.

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